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Christianity baffles me; it puts me on the edge. How do I make sense of nonsense? I won’t make judgements; I’ll leave you to judge. Christianity baffles me; it puts me on the edge. How do I make sense of nonsense? I won’t make judgements; I’ll leave you to judge. In the words of Professor James Harvey Robinson in ‘The Mind in the making’: “We like to continue to believe what we have been accustomed to accept true, and resentment aroused when doubt is cast upon any of our assumptions leads us to seek every manner of excuse for clinging to it. The result is that most of our so-called reasoning consists in finding arguments for going on believing as we already do.” As a lead to the post “9 questions”, https://newageofreason.wordpress.com/2009/11/06/9-questions/these analogies have been sent in by a contributor. Mr Ole was an hardened criminal, he maimed and killed at will. He raped and stole with impunity. Unfortunately, he was never captured all through his reign as he was a moving charms factory. He couldn’t also be touched ‘cuz of the weapon he clutched. He died peacefully in his bedroom in his country home mansion one night and was buried with pomp and pageantry. The Police thus got to know about his demise. They moved armoured vehicles and tanks into the country side and started shooting and shelling. They captured Mr OmoOle the only son of Mr Ole and took him to the Divisional Police HQ. After a trial at the local high court, he was sentenced to death by hanging. Even his explanations that he always tried to report but whenever he opens his mouth, nothing comes out fell on the deaf ears of the great judge of the land. Right at the Village square, he was hung with a noose and beneath him was a blazing fire that sparsely touches his naked GUILTY skin. Of course guilty, why did he choose to be the child of a robber? Why did his mother not run away from Mr Ole’s house? In a landmark judgement that will shape later judicial rulings, OmoOle was rightly executed to cleanse the land and appease its citizens. IN YOUR OWN CONSCIENCE TOO, HOW DOES THAT SOUND? I LEAVE YOU TO JUDGE.Why should a soul bear the guilt of another? Though Mr Ole was a criminal in Jaguda state, he was a generous and humble philanthropist in Jeje state,his state of origin.At a time,his earnings were dwindling and the Jejeans were suffering from drought.To bulk up his welfare packages to Jejeans, he killed Olediran, his only daughter and used her charred remains to make a more powerful charm that gave him the power to diappear and appear at will.With this, he was able to get more criminal money and thus made more Jejeans smile.He satisfied his wrath,his inner displaeasure of not making people as happy as he would have loved.JUDGE THAT! That’s about God sacrificing His only begotten son so that man may be saved. That God died for us on the cross is like the view of Jeremy Bentham, Utilitarianism i.e make more people happy at the expense of less people.On the surface,it looks nice and sweetly humane but let me break it down.Two people have to go for a a life saving operation overseas.It costs 5 million naira. Captain Olowo has the money to give out but not anything more than that.A debacle sets in; one of the two is his mother.Ordinarily, he should give it to his mother but if his mother dies, he will be the only one to mourn since he is an only child and is single.The other patient, a man has a lot of dependants spanning generations and he is also a local headmaster of the Community Primary School.He has brought a lot of reforms into the primary education of the community.Basically, he is indispensable.The principle of Utilitarianism dictates that the money goes to the headmaster.How reasonable is that? Jesus didn’t have to go through all that pain for what he didn’t do and God will never do such for it is the height of injustice. Note that two different gods or Jesuses are being analysed. The former was god on the cross for us and the latter the son on the cross for us. Christians will scream about the fact that not everyone can understand the doctrinal mysteries. Ambiguities are not meant to exist in a religion meant for everyone.The fact that I can’t comprehend it makes me unanswerable for not believing it.

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